International Conference on Translation & Literacy: call for papers

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International Conference on Translation & Literacy

11-12 October 2018

Throughout history, but particularly from the 1800s onwards, translation has played a pivotal, though often silent, role in the increasingly pressing goal of promoting literacy and the ideal of ‘universal education’. In the 19th and early 20th centuries serialized translations in newspapers, as well as inexpensive collections of translated works were often used both as a means of educating the masses and of increasing sales. Thus, translation has been instrumental in both the rise in literacy and the growth of capitalism. Resorting to translation was often an ambiguous means, both progressive and conservative in nature, of enhancing literacy, on the one hand, and of producing and disseminating pulp literature among the uneducated masses on the other, thus actively seeking to preserve the status quo in the fast-changing world of industrialization.

It could be argued that translation and literacy have always shared a common goal: that of striving to acquaint with unfamiliarity and difference, with a surplus of meaning and information, of molding citizens out of subjects by providing them with the ability to make informed choices in religion, politics, and culture are concerned, and, thereby, to expand their worldview, making it broader and more inclusive.

Nowadays, both the concept and the everyday practice of citizenship in a global world require informed and literate subjects, who are able to decode and interpret a range of different discursive practices produced with the help of multiple technologies. Therefore, ‘literacy’ has come to be redefined, eschewing the traditional definition of ‘classic’ literacy and encompassing a series of mental and practical tasks. UNESCO, for instance, argues that ‘[l]iterate societies are more than locales offering access to printed matter, written records, visual materials and advanced technologies; ideally, they enable the free exchange of text-based information and provide an array of opportunities for lifelong learning.’ (Education for all. Global Monitoring Report, 2006, http://www.unesco.org/education/GMR2006/full/chapt6_eng.pdf). NGOs are keen to stress the role that literacy plays in the development of communities and countries. However, as the report suggests, literacy is no longer just a goal to be achieved, but rather a process of continuous human development, a development based on information and on access to information. This, more often than not, implies that translation is understood as a process of negotiation with otherness and newness in highly mobile, ever-changing and, at times, volatile, modern-day communities. Nonetheless, translation has been conspicuously absent from debates about literacy.

This call invites researchers to reflect on the ways in which translation and literacy have impacted on each other, both in the past and in the present.

Possible topics include:

• Translation, literacy and citizenship in a global age

• Translation and universal education

• Literacy and the challenges of multilingualism

• Translation and migration(s)

• Translation, literacy and visuality

• Translatory literacy

• Literacy and translation history

• Pseudotranslation and the growth of literacy

• Translation in anthologies, collections

•Translation, literacy and media evolution

 

Keynote Speakers:

João Almeida Flor (Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Lisboa)

José Luís Cardoso (Instituto de Ciências Sociais da Universidade de Lisboa)

Loredana Polezzi (Cardiff University)

The conference languages are English and Portuguese. Speakers should prepare for a 20-minute presentation followed by questions. Please send a 250-word abstract, as well as a brief biographical note (100 words) to translation.literacy@gmail.com by March 9, 2018.

Proposals should list the paper title, name, institutional affiliation, and contact details. Notification of abstract acceptance or rejection will take place by April 30, 2018.

Organizing Committee:

Teresa Seruya

Maria Lin Moniz

Alexandra Lopes

Scientific Committee:

Ana Margarida Abrantes (Faculdade de Ciências Humanas – Universidade Católica Portuguesa / CECC)

Alexandra Assis Rosa (Faculdade de Letras – Universidade de Lisboa / CEAUL)

Maria Zulmira Castanheira (Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas – Universidade Nova de Lisboa / CETAPS)

Cristina Gómez Castro (Universidad de León – Spain)

Alexandra Lopes (Faculdade de Ciências Humanas – Universidade Católica Portuguesa / CECC)

Rita Maia (Faculdade de Ciências Humanas – Universidade Católica Portuguesa / CECC)

Denise Merkle (Université de Moncton– Canada)

Maria Lin Moniz (Centro de Estudos de Comunicação e Cultura)

Teresa Seruya (Faculdade de Letras – Universidade de Lisboa / CECC)

Michelle Woods (SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, NY – EUA)

Fees:

Early bird (by June 15):

Participants – 100€

Students (ID required) — 60€

 

After June 15 and no later than July 31:

Participants – 120€

Students (ID required) – 80€

The registration fee includes coffee breaks and lunches on the two days of the conference, as well as all conference documentation.

Payment:

By bank transfer:

NIB 003300000017013412105

IBAN PT50 0033 0000 0017 0134 1210 5 SWIFT BCOMPTPL

By check made out to:

Universidade Católica Portuguesa

and sent to:

Centro de Estudos de Comunicação e Cultura

a/c Elisabete Carvalho

Universidade Católica Portuguesa

Faculdade de Ciências Humanas

Palma de Cima

1649-023 Lisboa Portugal

Please send payment notification (in case of online payment) or a copy of the bank transfer document to the above email.

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CARE 2018 | Investigação e Desenvolvimento

No próximo dia 5 de Janeiro, o encontro CARE 2018|Investigação e Desenvolvimento terá lugar na Universidade Católica, das 10 h às 18h, e terá como orador principal Carlos Moedas, Comissário EU, entre outras palestras.

O programa inclui também uma apresentação do CECC, pelo seu director, Peter Hanenberg.

Pode conhecer o programa e realizar a sua inscrição aqui

4 C’s: Conferência “Convivialidade e o Institucional”

4Cs Lisbon Conference_Conviviality and the Institutional é a primeira conferência de dois dias realizada no âmbito do 4Cs – do Conflito à Convivialidade através da Criatividade e da Cultura, um projeto de cooperação apoiado pela Comissão Europeia no quadro da Europa Criativa, subprograma Cultura. Coordenado pela Universidade Católica Portuguesa, o 4Cs tem o objetivo de explorar a forma como a arte e a cultura podem ser grandes recursos para a abordagem à temática do conflito. Um dos principais objetivos do projeto é contribuir para a formação e educação. O programa inclui exposições, residências artísticas e de investigação, ciclos de cinema, laboratórios de mediação, workshops, conferências, publicações, uma plataforma online e uma Summer School.

Isabel Capeloa Gil na conferência “Over Her Dead Body Redux. Feminism for the 21st Century

Over her dead body ICG

Isabel Capeloa Gil, directora do Lisbon Consortium e coordenadora da linha de investigação do CECC ‘Art, Culture and Citizenship’ apresentou, no passado dia 21 de Outubro, na Universidade de Zurique, no âmbito da conferência “Over her dead body redux. Feminism for the 21st Century”, a comunicação “Theory in a Post-theoretical World. Beyoncé and the Afterlife of Over Her Dead Body“.

25 years after Over Her Dead Body, to write, to speak about women – as subject and as representation – continues to be an urgent, disturbing and contentious experience. In the discursive flow of critique, Elisabeth Bronfen’s piercing clarity about the object so ‘excessively obvious that it escapes observation” (Bronfen,1992:3) continues to hold a sway over the criticality of feminine representation. By performing the inventory of topical images, that traditionally connote femininity to undo them, I suggest Beyoncé’s Lemonade can be positively read as a case in point of the forensic dynamics that Elisabeth Bronfen has diagnosed at the root of the work of representation.  Beyoncé embraces the terms of the production of woman in mainstream discourse to resist identification with that very same image.The gesture that repeats the stereotype is arguably the same that unpacks it, suggesting the indissoluble, and ambivalent knot between the dominant representation of woman as object of desire and the critique thereof.
Isabel Capeloa Gil

‘Jane Austen Superstar’: prazo alargado para submissão de propostas

2017 marks two centuries since the death of Jane Austen in July 18, 1817. Two hundred years after her premature death, the English writer has never been more famous: from movies to tote bags, from mugs to rewritings of various sorts (sequels, guides to dating, adaptations to modern-day circumstances, biographies and fictional biographies, and, of course, translations), her work has invaded and pervaded contemporary imagination.

As Virginia Woolf famously put it, “[h]ere was a woman about the year 1800 writing without hate, without bitterness, without fear, without protest, without preaching” (Woolf, 2008: 88). This apparently unassuming woman penned six powerful novels that have changed the world. Seen by some as an unwitting precursor to the women’s rights movements, read by others as a conservative author, Austen never ceases to baffle the contemporary reader, writer and critic alike: is she a “secret radical”, as Helena Kelly suggests (2006), or is she apolitical and / or a middle-of-the-road author? Is she an author who writes about trifles or does she, as Woolf surmised in 1925, stimulate “us to supply what is not there”? Woolf further adds that “[w]hat she offers is, apparently, a trifle, yet is composed of something that expands in the reader’s mind and endows with the most enduring form of life scenes which are outwardly trivial.”

The conference would like to celebrate Jane Austen’s life and work by discussing (a) how her books form part of the contemporary experience of love, gender, family, social and pecuniary relations and (b) how her writing style, her silences as well as her favourite topics, and her language have shaped modern-day literature, both in the UK and abroad.

In a nutshell, the conference aims to discuss both the author’s rootedness in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, her authorial longevity and acumen, and her to some extent intriguing pop star fame in the last 20 years, proving indeed that “[h]er legacy is not a piece of reportage from the society of a particular past, but a wise and compelling exploration of human nature” (Shields, 2001: 170).

Papers on the following topics are welcome:

  • Authorship and (in)visibility
  • Austen and feminism
  • Jane goes to Hollywood
  • Austen and TV adaptations
  • Austen as a popular icon (fashion, books, visual icon, and other memorabilia)
  • Austen’s critical fortune
  • Austen and (the absence) of history
  • Austen and / in the great tradition
  • Masculinities & the economics of power
  • Jane and mothers
  • Austen and the social value of gossip
  • Flattery in Jane Austen
  • Jane in translation / Translating Austen
  • Places in Austen
  • Austen and politics
  • ‘Janeitism’: from fandom to commodification

Keynote lecturers:

  • Kathryn Sutherland (University of Oxford)
  • Helena Kelly (Mansfield College, Oxford)

Organising Committee:

  • Alexandra Lopes
  • Rita Bueno Maia
  • Maria Sequeira Mendes

Scientific Committee:

  • Teresa Casal (University of Lisbon)
  • João Ferreira Duarte (University of Lisbon)
  • Alexandra Lopes (Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Rita Bueno Maia (Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Adriana Martins (Universidade Católica Portuguesa)
  • Rogério Miguel Puga (New University of Lisbon)
  • Jorge Vaz de Carvalho (Universidade Católica Portuguesa)

The conference languages are English and Portuguese. Speakers should prepare for a 20-minute presentation followed by questions. Please send a 250-word abstract, as well as a brief biographical note (100 words) to austensuperstar@gmail.com by August 27, 2017.

Proposals should list the paper title, name, institutional affiliation, and contact details. Notification of abstract acceptance or rejection will take place by September 18, 2017.

Fees:

Early bird (by October 9):
Participants – 100€
Students (ID required) — 50€
After October 9 but no later than November 10:
Participants – 120€
Students (ID required) – 60€
The registration fee includes coffee breaks on the two days of the conference, as well as conference documentation.

Payment:

By bank transfer:
NIB 003300000017013412105
IBAN PT50 0033 0000 0017 0134 1210 5
SWIFT BCOMPTPL
By cheque made out to:
Universidade Católica Portuguesa
and sent to:
Centro de Estudos de Comunicação e Cultura
a/c Elisabete Carvalho
Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Faculdade de Ciências Humanas
Palma de Cima
1649-023 Lisboa Portugal

Please send the notification (in case of online-banking) or a copy of the bank transfer document to the aforementioned email.

18 anos, 11 colóquios: celebrar os Estudos de Tradução

O colóquio “Translating Fear”, que reúne investigadores de várias nacionalidades nos dias 21 e 22 de Julho, na Universidade Católica Portuguesa, é o 11º encontro de uma iniciativa com 18 anos que contribuiu para o desenvolvimento dos Estudos de Tradução em Portugal.

Teresa Seruya, investigadora do CECC e Professora da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Lisboa, keynote speaker desta edição, e desde a primeira hora uma das principais responsáveis pelo projecto, conta o percurso dos encontros de Estudos de Tradução: